Perhaps one of the areas of Pikeville Medical Center (PMC) that is most crucial to the overall health of the region is the Intensive Care Unit (ICU). The expertly skilled physicians and dedicated staff of PMC’s ICU take pride in caring for the sickest of patients, utilizing state-of-the-art equipment and cutting-edge technology to get patients well enough to return home.

PMC’s ICU is comprised of 57 total beds spread across floors three, four, and nine of May Tower. Third Floor ICU is exclusively reserved for surgery and trauma patients. Floors four and nine are for patients who are critically ill from sickness. The newly remodeled ninth floor has many amenities to make families more comfortable while visiting their loved ones. The rooms are very private, and nurses are stationed in close proximity, just outside the door for ease of communication and patient monitoring.

“These rooms have a comfortable and spacious family area, making it easier to stay with your loved one around the clock,” said Critical Care Director Josh Damron, RN. “We encourage families to be involved in every aspect of patient care.”

Damron explained the ICU beds are also very high-tech. PMC utilizes Stryker Intouch ICU beds, each equipped with a lift for aid in the safety of the patient as well as the staff. The beds also have a gel surface which is better for pulmonary therapies and wound prevention. In the event a patient does not speak English, the bed even has the ability to translate questions and comments into other languages.

Eight board-certified specialists work as a team to provide 24/7 care to patients with a wide variety of severe illness or injury. These physicians are Anthony Dempsey, MD, Rami Hanna, MD, Yousef Hattab, MD, Abdallah Kharnaf, MD, Nisrine Bou Malhab, MD, Judson Mehl, MD, and Worawute Supaongrapa, MD.  They are led by Medical Director of Pulmonary and Critical Care/ECMO Practice Ayorinde Medaiyese, MD. Together, they treat patients from all over the region who are suffering from life-threatening illness or injury, and who require constant monitoring.